Category Archives: Drug Companies

With over 1.5 million drug and medical device related injuries each year, consumers are forced to take legal action. Find out if you have a lawsuit. Read news stories about dangerous medical devices and prescription drugs, health studies and pharmaceutical litigation.

‘Genetic Paparazzi’ Could Steal Celebrity DNA For Dark Purposes, Professor Warns

Celebrity fans can sometimes be passionate and bordering on crazy, and now there’s a worry that infatuation could get more obsessive and even sinister.

Experts are now warning against ‘genetic paparazzi’ and the potential rise of ‘celebrity DNA theft’. Yes that’s right, actual stealing of DNA.

Law professors from Georgia State University and the University of Maryland are now arguing that ‘genetic paparazzi’ could soon be coming after the DNA of public figures, including celebrities and politicians.

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Teva faces $100M lawsuit from Israel over unpaid Copaxone royalties: report

Teva Pharmaceuticals’ big-selling multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone is losing ground in the U.S. thanks to generics, but the medicine was once the company’s primary growth driver. Now, it’s at the center of a lawsuit filed by the state of Israel over alleged unpaid royalties.

Israel has sued Teva for $100 million in royalties on the longer-lasting version of the medicine, Globes reports. While Teva owns Copaxone marketing rights, scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science developed the medicine, the publication reports. 

When the original daily version, first approved in the U.S. in 1996, neared its patent expiration, the company switched its efforts to a longer-acting version. In its lawsuit, Israel claims government scientists at the Weizmann Institute developed the long-acting version as well, so it’s owed royalties.

“The state has no alternative but to take legal action against Teva to ensure that it receives suitable remuneration for using public resources that brought Teva very large scale revenue,” the suit says, according to Globes. 

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Who owns Einstein? The battle for the world’s most famous face

Thanks to a savvy California lawyer, Albert Einstein has earned far more posthumously than he ever did in his lifetime. But is that what the great scientist would have wanted?


In July 2003, the physicist and Pulitzer-prize-nominated author Dr Tony Rothman received an email from his editor bearing unwelcome news. Rothman’s new book was weeks from publication. An affable debunking of widely misunderstood stories from the history of science, the title, Everything’s Relative, was a playful nod to Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity. Rothman had asked his publisher, Wiley, to put a picture of history’s most famous scientist on the cover.

“An issue just came up,” the email read. Rothman’s editor had been warned that Einstein’s estate is “extremely aggressive and litigious”. Unless the publisher paid a hefty fee to use the image of Einstein, the editor explained, they could be sued. Rothman was dismayed. “I think this is ridiculous,” he replied via email. “If the estate went after everybody who used [Einstein’s image], they’d have no time on their hands for anything else. Are you sure they even own it?” Rothman’s editor was unwilling to investigate the legal technicalities. It was not the first time the publisher had encountered hostile heirs, he said, referring darkly to “the slavering jackals” who run the literary estate of one iconic 20th-century American writer.

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Trump suggested launching missiles into Mexico to destroy cartels’ drug labs, former defense secretary says

  • Former defense secretary Mark Esper said Trump suggested missiles to wipe out Mexico’s drug cartels.
  • He suggested shooting missiles at drug labs in Mexico at least twice in 2020, Esper said.
  • Esper recounted the exchange in his memoir, excerpts of which were published by The New York Times.

Former President Donald Trump suggested launching missiles into Mexico to destroy cartels’ drug labs, the former defense secretary Mark Esper wrote in his upcoming memoir, according to The New York Times.

Several excerpts from Esper’s book, “A Sacred Oath: Memoirs of a Secretary of Defense During Extraordinary Times,” were published by the Times on Thursday. The memoir will be published on May 10.

Esper, who served as defense secretary from July 2019 until November 2020, wrote in the book that Trump had become increasingly unhappy about drugs coming through the Mexican border.

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Colombian Cartel Leader Faces Drug Charges After Extradition to New York

The man known as Otoniel is accused of smuggling tons of cocaine and assassinating police officers and civic leaders.

A man accused of leading a Colombian cartel was extradited to face federal drug-trafficking charges in Brooklyn, ending a yearslong effort to hobble an organization that a federal prosecutor said on Thursday smuggled an “outrageous” amount of cocaine into the United States.

Dairo Antonio Úsuga, more commonly known as Otoniel, led a force thousands strong. He was arrested in October and has long stood accused of carrying out assassinations of police officers and civic leaders.

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