Tag Archives: legal news

ACLU Wisconsin calling for temporary ban on evictions amid pandemic

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV)– The American Civil Liberties Union of Wisconsin is calling for evictions to be temporarily banned in the state as many residents face financial turmoil caused by the pandemic.

The Wisconsin chapter is joining affiliates in 19 other states to push lawmakers to issue or expand “statewide moratoria against evictions and commit to preventing mass evictions after these moratoria end,” according to a statement Thursday.

ACLU said people of color and women especially are in need of such protections.

“The disproportionate toll that the COVID-19 crisis has taken on communities of color has already been devastating enough, and the burden will only become more severe if action isn’t taken to prevent evictions and utility shut-offs,” said Asma Kadri Keeler, staff attorney with the ACLU of Wisconsin.

“Homelessness and housing instability cause a myriad of lasting financial, emotional, and health problems which victimize women of color and their families most acutely. In the pandemic context, it also poses a serious health risk to the public writ large,” Asma Kadri Keeler adds.

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Federal Judge Denies Cali Drug Cartel Kingpin Early Release

A Miami federal judge has denied an early release from prison for one of the kingpins of the Cali drug cartel, ruling that his health and the threat of the COVID-19 coronavirus are not sufficient grounds to end his incarceration. The decision from U.S. District Judge Federico Moreno means that Gilberto Rodriguez Orejuela, an 81-year-old former leader of the Cali cartel, will continue to serve his 30-year sentence at a federal penitentiary in North Carolina.

Rodriguez Orejuela and his brother Miguel, former leaders of the infamous Cali drug cartel, pleaded guilty in 2006 to trafficking more than 200 tons of cocaine from Colombia to the United States during the 1980s and ‘90s. The brothers reached a plea deal with federal prosecutors in Miami that allowed dozens of family members to avoid prosecution for money laundering and obstruction of justice charges as part of the agreement.

Rodriquez Orejuela’s attorney had filed a petition with the court requesting early release for his client on compassionate grounds. Attorney David O. Markus argued that Rodriquez Orejuela’s medical history, which includes colon cancer, prostate cancer, two heart attacks, high blood pressure, skin cancer, gout, chronic anxiety and depression, qualified him for compassionate release. Markus also cited media accounts of the threat that the COVID-19 poses to prison inmates as cause to let him out of prison.

“Because there were already sufficient reasons to release him, this crisis gives the court further reasons to grant his motion,” he said.

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Mafia confessions: Why mob forgave one criminal who snitched on the notorious organisation

MAFIA bosses were revealed to have forgiven a criminal who snitched on the notorious outfit after successfully conducting the largest cash robbery in American history.

Henry Hill turned from criminal to police witness shortly after the now-infamous ‘Lufthansa Heist’ on December 11, 1978.

The Mafia were tipped-off about a large sum of cash that would be flown into John F Kennedy International Airport (JFK), by an airport worker who owed one of their associates more than $20,000 (£16,000) in gambling debts.

Ms Otwary revealed Henry Hill and his crew stepped-up to the challenge in a bid to “impress their overlords”.

He told Express.co.uk: “Being that he was half-Irish and half-Italian, he didn’t qualify to become a ‘made man’ that would be protected within the structure of Italian or Sicilian Italian organised crime.”

On the day of the heist, the small-time thugs arrived at JFK around 3am to commit what would become the largest cash robbery in US history and after that one of the longest-investigated crimes.

Six men covered with balaclavas took multiple Lufthansa airline workers hostage as part of the operation and pistol-whipped one who tried to raise the alarm.

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Civil rights and religious leaders urge African Americans to defy governors’ efforts to reopen businesses

A coalition of prominent civil rights and black religious leaders is urging African American residents who live in states that are moving swiftly to reopen their economies to stay home in defiance of governors until there’s evidence the coronavirus outbreak has eased.

The group, convened by the Conference of National Black Churches and Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network, said some governors are demonstrating “reckless disregard for the health and life of black residents” and called for black churches and businesses to remain closed in those states until there’s evidence that it’s safe to resume more normal activity.

“We do not take it lightly to encourage members of our communities to defy the orders of state governors,” the officials said in a statement. “Our sacred duty is to support and advance the life and health of Black people, families and communities in our country.”

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Convicted ‘pharma bro’ Martin Shkreli wants early release to work on coronavirus cure

Lawyers for Shkreli, who is in federal prison, claim he has “devoted countless hours” to researching a cure.

Lawyers for “pharma bro” Martin Shkreli asked a federal judge Wednesday to release him from prison so he can help find a cure for COVID-19, the disease associated with the coronavirus, court records show.

The documents, filed in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y., say Shkreli, 37, has “devoted countless hours” to developing a cure for the disease, which has killed nearly 45,000 people in the United States and tens of thousands more around the world.

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Shkreli is serving a seven-year sentence at a federal prison in Allenwood, Pennsylvania, after being convicted in 2017 on securities fraud and conspiracy charges. His lawyers asked in the filing that he be allowed to serve the rest of his term at home with an electronic monitor.

Shkreli, a former biotech CEO and hedge fund manager, had been accused of repeatedly lying about the performance of his funds and raiding his company’s assets to provide returns to investors. He first gained notoriety in 2015 after he raised the price of a lifesaving anti-parasite drug by 5,000 percent.

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