Tag Archives: mafia

Ten members of NYC crime family arrested including 87-year-old boss

Ten members of NYC crime family arrested including 87-year-old boss

Members of a New York City crime family threatened violence, pressured workers and pocketed phony “pension” payments in a two-decade plot to seize control of a city construction union and its lucrative employee health insurance program, prosecutors alleged in an indictment unsealed on Tuesday.

Ten members of the Colombo crime family, including 87-year-old boss Andrew “Mush” Russo, were charged in connection with the scheme, which prosecutors said had all the major trappings of Mafia-type shakedowns seen in TV shows like “The Sopranos” and movies.

Prosecutors said crime family members pressured the union to steer health plan business to pals, sought at least $10,000 (£7,200) per month in kickbacks and threatened to kill a union official if he didn’t comply, telling an associate on a recorded telephone call in June: “I’ll put him in the ground right in front of his wife and kids.”

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Turkish mafia boss dishes dirt, becomes YouTube phenomenon

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — From alleged drug trafficking and a murder cover-up to weapons transfers to Islamic militants, a convicted crime ringleader has been dishing the dirt on members of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s ruling party through a series of tell-all videos that have captivated the nation and turned him into an unlikely social media phenomenon.

Sedat Peker, a 49-year-old fugitive crime boss, who once openly supported Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party, has been releasing nearly 90-minute long videos from his stated base in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, making scandalous but yet-unproven drip-by-drip allegations, in an apparent bid to settle scores with political figures.

The weekly YouTube videos have been viewed more than 75 million times, causing an uproar, heightening concerns over Turkish state corruption and putting officials on the defensive. They have also exposed alleged rifts between rival factions within the ruling party and added to Erdogan’s troubles as he battles an economic downturn and the coronavirus pandemic.

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Former Mafia capo has doubts about CT gambling expansion

Connecticut leaders announced late last month they’d reached a deal with members of the state’s tribal nations that would allow both online gambling and sports betting.

But one former member of the New York mob who’s said he had a hand in rigging sports betting on Wednesday suggested expanding the state’s gambling options might not be such a good idea

“Look, you know I’ve always been against legalized gambling, online especially,” said Michael Franzese, who was the keynote speaker for a virtual discussion hosted by the center for sports integrity at the University of New Haven.

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Mafia confessions: Why mob forgave one criminal who snitched on the notorious organisation

MAFIA bosses were revealed to have forgiven a criminal who snitched on the notorious outfit after successfully conducting the largest cash robbery in American history.

Henry Hill turned from criminal to police witness shortly after the now-infamous ‘Lufthansa Heist’ on December 11, 1978.

The Mafia were tipped-off about a large sum of cash that would be flown into John F Kennedy International Airport (JFK), by an airport worker who owed one of their associates more than $20,000 (£16,000) in gambling debts.

Ms Otwary revealed Henry Hill and his crew stepped-up to the challenge in a bid to “impress their overlords”.

He told Express.co.uk: “Being that he was half-Irish and half-Italian, he didn’t qualify to become a ‘made man’ that would be protected within the structure of Italian or Sicilian Italian organised crime.”

On the day of the heist, the small-time thugs arrived at JFK around 3am to commit what would become the largest cash robbery in US history and after that one of the longest-investigated crimes.

Six men covered with balaclavas took multiple Lufthansa airline workers hostage as part of the operation and pistol-whipped one who tried to raise the alarm.

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Why the mafia are taking care of everyone’s business

Organised crime is already giving food parcels to the poor in Italy and Mexico. For the cartels and syndicates, this crisis is an opportunity

Pestilence presents a moment of great opportunity for many businesses.

Consider the speed at which contracts are put out to tender to meet extraordinary needs. Consider the ability to move goods and money without all the normal checks or legal and bureaucratic protocols. Plague is a boon for the commercial class.

The art of profit is based on exploiting need, and no one has perfected that dark art better than organised crime. The Covid-19 pandemic is already demonstrating this. With their usual business acumen, criminal organisations have, in recent decades, invested in a number of companies that have turned out to be very relevant to the present crisis: multi-service businesses (catering, cleaning or disinfection), industrial laundries, transport, funeral homes, waste collection, food distribution – and the health. All of these sectors have become fundamental to our survival over recent weeks, and will probably remain so for a good while.

In Italy, police have already raised the alarm about mafia cartels’ investment in the production and distribution of “epidemic kits”, comprising masks, hand sanitiser and latex gloves. These products are today almost impossible to find, and the sudden overwhelming demand (surely destined to continue over the coming months) has caused prices to skyrocket.

For the Calabrian mafia, the ’ndrangheta, this would be familiar territory: for years it made capital investments in the pharmaceutical and healthcare products sectors. In March 2016, it was revealed that the ’ndrangheta had been working aggressively to establish itself in medical and pharmaceutical industries across Lombardy – which became Italy’s Covid-19 “Ground Zero” – even dispatching cartel operatives and their relatives to qualify in medicine, nursing and pharmacology.

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