Tag Archives: mafia news

Former Mafia killer Anthony Arillotta denies assault charge; accused of throwing lemonade carton at relative

SPRINGFIELD — The region’s most notorious mafia killer was arrested Sunday and charged with assault and battery with a dangerous weapon after he allegedly hurled a carton of lemonade at a female relative.

The dispute was over a sick dog, which a witness said Anthony J. Arillotta threatened to kill, according to court records.

Arillotta, 50, pleaded not guilty at his arraignment Monday in Springfield District Court. Judge John McKenna set his bail at $500.

Assistant District Attorney Tyson Fung asked the judge to set bail at $2,500 cash, saying Arillotta, of Springfield, was on federal probation.

Arillotta was the federal government’s star witness in two separate mob murder trials in New York City in 2011 and 2012. He began cooperating with law enforcement shortly after his 2010 arrest, according to court filings and testimony.

In 2010 he pleaded guilty to the 2003 murders of former mentor Adolfo “Big Al” Bruno and his former brother-in-law, Gary Westerman, and the attempted murder of a New York union boss. He served an eight-year prison sentence and opted out of witness protection. Sources said he returned to Springfield in the spring of 2017.

At his arraignment Monday, McKenna set Sept. 25 as a “clarification of counsel” date, saying Arillotta does not qualify for a court-appointed lawyer. Kevin Riva, a private practice bar advocate who was representing multiple defendants in district court Monday, represented Arillotta at the arraignment only.

Riva said Arillotta was working full time, and that a family member was at court to post bail.

According to Riva’s account of the incident, Arillotta is allergic to dogs; a family member left a sick dog at the home, and he wanted it removed.

Read Full Article – https://www.masslive.com/springfield/2019/07/former-mafia-killer-anthony-arillotta-denies-assault-charge-accused-of-throwing-lemonade-carton-at-relative.html

Biggest Mafia bust in Ontario, Canada, nets 15 arrests, $33 million worth of homes and cars

A Mafia bust — believed to be the biggest in the Canadian province of Ontario — has resulted in 15 arrests and the seizure of homes and sports cars worth $33 million.

“Project Sindicato” targeted the Figliomeni crime family which has links to Italy’s notorious ‘Ndrangehta Mafia clan in Italy, York Regional Police announced Thursday.

“(The Figliomeni crime family) has benefitted from generations of crime to live a glamorous and indulgent lifestyle at the expense of law-abiding citizens,” Police Chief Eric Jolliffe said, according to the Toronto Sun. “We have dismantled the financial structure of this organized crime organization both here and in Italy.”

The investigation led to separate arrests of 12 individuals in Calabria, Italy, according to CTV News. Those arrests were announced Wednesday by Italian State Police.

York Police launched the investigation 18 months ago in response to a spike in shootings and arsons in Vaughan, a city north of Toronto, CTV reported.

Those arrested were accused of operating nearly a dozen illegal backroom gambling dens in various cafes and extending loans to tapped-out gamblers at extortionate rates who were then threatened with harm if they didn’t pay up, CTV reported.

The arrests included the reputed head of the crime family, Angelo Figliomeni, who was charged with directing a criminal organization, money laundering and fraud, police said.

Read Full Article From – https://www.foxnews.com/world/biggest-mafia-bust-in-canada-nets-15-arrests-33-million-worth-of-homes-and-cars

19 Mafia Suspects Arrested, Including Some From The Gambino Family

Police in the U.S. and Italy recently arrested a number of mafiosi. NPR’s Lulu Garcia-Navarro asks author John Dickie about a trans-Atlantic criminal connection.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

The Mafia is back in the headlines in a series of raids involving the FBI and Italian police. Nineteen Mafia suspects were arrested in New York and Italy this past week; among them, some from the notorious Gambino crime family. John Dickie studies the Italian Mafia. He’s the author of “Blood Brotherhoods,” and he joins us now to talk about why these raids are significant.

Welcome.

JOHN DICKIE: Thank you. Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Let’s start with these raids. What do you make of them?

DICKIE: Really, you have to begin the story back in the late 1970s when a number of Mafiosi with strong family ties and organizational ties across the Atlantic between Sicily and the eastern coast of the United States started trafficking in heroin in huge quantities. Now, in the early 1980s in Sicily, a group of Mafiosi who had been left out of that lucrative trade essentially mounted a kind of military coup de tar within the Sicilian Mafia in Sicily and either murdered or expelled from Sicily the members of the Gambino-Inzerillo family. And since then, they have been trying to make a return to re-establish that trans-Atlantic bridge.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: The families on the losing end of that turf war fled to the United States. Why the United States? And it seems strange that members of a crime family could find footing in the United States if they were known sort of Mafiosi.

DICKIE: We’ve really only begun to understand in recent years just how profoundly important – to the history of the Mafia since at least the very early 20th century – is this whole trans-Atlantic connection. This is not something that just happened once when millions of Sicilians emigrated to the United States before the First World War. This is an ongoing process, the toing and froing of criminal personnel, criminal commodities, criminal ideas. The Inzerillos and Gambino families are intermarried over several generations as part of this process.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And so what happened recently is that members of this family who had fled to United States were then trying to go back and re-establish themselves in Sicily again. And it was leading to sort of a turf battle.

DICKIE: Yeah, that’s right. I mean, the return of the Inzerillos represents a huge internal political problem for Cosa Nostra in Sicily because the people who governed the Sicilian Mafia for a generation from the early 1980s were precisely the people who had murdered many of the Inzerillos, who had effectively ethnically cleansed the others out of Sicily and sent them back to the United States.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So the Mafia survives off what it’s always survived off of, which is essentially protection rackets, right? But where are they at this particular moment? I think many of us think of the Mafia as being a sort of pale shadow of what it once was, both in the U.S. and Italy.

DICKIE: I think that’s true, but that is a great symptom of both the huge step change that there’s been since particularly the early 1990s in the law enforcement response to organized crime in Italy. And another great indicator of that is this trans-Atlantic cooperation between the authorities. They’ve now worked together for a generation because they understand the importance of this old bridge. It’s no coincidence that FBI headquarters has in it a bust of Giovanni Falcone, the great hero and martyr of the struggle against the Mafia in Italy. He was blown up, along, with his wife and his armed escort by a Mafia bomb in 1992 because Falcone was who pioneered this trans-Atlantic cooperation in the fight against the Mafia. He got it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Do you consider these raids are a major blow to the attempts to sort of reanimate these links?

DICKIE: I think this is an ongoing process. It clearly shows that the authorities are watching it very, very carefully. They understand it and know it. And that – from that point of view, it’s reassuring. But it’s always difficult to tell, when an operation is as fresh as this one is, just how damaging it will prove to be.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That’s John Dickie, professor of Italian studies at University College London. Thank you so much.

DICKIE: Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE NIKLAS AMAN’S “ESCALATORS AND GLASS”)

Sourced From – https://www.npr.org/2019/07/21/743847214/19-mafia-suspects-arrested-including-some-from-the-gambino-family

Pot farm’s neighbors lose federal suit filed under anti-Mafia law

DENVER — A federal jury has ruled against a Colorado couple who claimed that a marijuana-growing operation hurt the value of their property in a case that was closely watched by the U.S. cannabis industry.

Jurors reached their verdict in Denver after deliberating for about a half day, The Colorado Sunreported Wednesday.

It was the first time a jury considered a lawsuit using federal anti-racketeering law to target a marijuana company.

“A loss in this case would have meant the loss of his business,” Matthew Buck, the lawyer for operation’s owner, Parker Walton, told The Sun.

The marijuana industry has followed the case since 2015, when attorneys with a Washington, D.C., firm first filed their complaint on behalf of Hope and Michael Reilly over Walton’s operation in the rural southern Colorado town of Rye.

Vulnerability to similar lawsuits is among the many risks facing marijuana operations licensed by states but still violating federal law. Lawsuits using the same strategy have been filed in California, Massachusetts and Oregon.

One of the Reillys’ lawyers, Brian Barnes, said the couple bought their land for its views of Pikes Peak, built a house there and hike and ride horses on the property.

But they claimed “pungent, foul odors” from a neighboring indoor marijuana-growing operation have hurt the property’s value and the couple’s ability to use and enjoy it.

Congress created the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act to target the Mafia in the 1970s, allowing prosecutors to argue leaders of a criminal enterprise should pay a price along with lower-level defendants.

Full Read – http://www.nwaonline.com/news/2018/nov/02/pot-farm-s-neighbors-lose-federal-suit-/

Former reputed head of New England Mafia completes prison sentence

An East Boston man whom prosecutors described in 2012 as the head of the New England Mafia completed in February his 78-month sentence for racketeering and is now walking free, records show.

Anthony L. DiNunzio, 58, was released from custody on Feb. 22, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons website. His release was first reported Tuesday by WPRI-TV in Rhode Island.

DiNunzio’s lawyer declined to comment Tuesday.

The mobster pleaded guilty in 2012 to racketeering conspiracy for his role in shaking down Providence strip joints.