Tag Archives: death penalty

Dylann Roof Sentenced to Death, 1st to Get Death Penalty for Federal Hate Crimes

Dylann Roof, 22, has been sentenced to death for killing nine black churchgoers during a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina.

The jury’s decision had to be unanimous to sentence Roof to death. This is the first time a death penalty verdict was rendered in a federal hate crimes case, the Justice Department said.

The jury began deliberating Roof’s fate earlier today, after Roof told the jury in a closing statement, “I still feel like I had to do it.”

The verdict comes at the end of the federal death penalty case in which he was convicted of hate crimes resulting in death, among other charges. Roof also faces a state trial in which he may again face the death penalty.

Melvin Graham, brother of slain churchgoer Cynthia Hurd, said after the sentence was read, “Today we had justice for my sister.”

But he called Roof’s sentence a “very hollow victory because my sister’s still gone. I wish that this verdict could have brought her back.”

Graham said he supported the death penalty in this case, calling Roof’s crimes “executions.” He added that Roof took nine lives in a brutal fashion with no remorse.

“It’s a hard thing to know that someone’s going to lose their life,” Graham said of Roof. “But when you look at the totality of what happened, it’s hard to say that this person deserves to live.”

Roof’s family said in a statement, “We will always love Dylann. We will struggle as long as we live to understand why he committed this horrible attack, which caused so much pain to so many good people. We wish to express the grief we feel for the victims of his crimes, and our sympathy to the many families he has hurt. We continue to pray for the Emanuel AME families and the Charleston community.”

Roof’s defense said in a statement that the “sentencing decision means that this case will not be over for a very long time. We are sorry that, despite our best efforts, the legal proceedings have shed so little light on the reasons for this tragedy.”

The defense added that they express sympathy “to all of the families who were so grievously hurt by Dylann Roof’s actions.”

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in a statement, “Roof sought out and opened fire on African-American parishioners engaged in worship. … He did so because of their race. And he did so to interfere with their peaceful exercise of religion. The victims in the case led lives as compassionate civic and religious leaders; devoted public servants and teachers; and beloved family members and friends.

“No verdict can bring back the nine we lost that day at Mother Emanuel,” Lynch continued. “And no verdict can heal the wounds of the five church members who survived the attack or the souls of those who lost loved ones to Roof’s callous hand. But we hope that the completion of the prosecution provides the people of Charleston — and the people of our nation — with a measure of closure.”

Graham told reporters after the sentence was read, “I don’t know how you move forward. … Cynthia’s not here. A piece of our family’s gone. … A piece of each one of us died.”

“I lost a friend and a confidante,” he continued. “How do I move forward without a part of my body? … I think what I’m going to try to do is keep my sister’s name, her legacy alive as best I can.”

Roof told the jury earlier today in his closing argument, according to ABC affiliate WCIV, “I think that it’s safe to say that no one in their right mind wants to go into a church and kill people.”

He added, “In my confession to the FBI, I told them that I had to do it.

“But obviously that’s not really true. I didn’t have to do it, and no one made me do it,” Roof said, according to WCIV. “What I meant when I said that was I felt like I had to do it, and I still feel like I had to do it.”

 

Full read  – http://abcnews.go.com/US/charleston-church-shooter-dylann-roof-sentenced-death/story?id=44674575

Texas’s 2016 Execution Tally Was the Lowest Since 1996 — Here’s Why

Houston-based Texas Defender Services is trying to ensure the judicial system functions properly even in the most extreme circumstances.

By Adam Doster 12/29/2016 at 8:00am

A few weeks after a bad breakup, in 1995, Duane Buck stormed into the Houston home of his ex-girlfriend and murdered her while her three children watched. He also killed the man he thought she was sleeping with and shot his own stepsister, a bystander who survived. Though remorseful (and high at the time), Buck never disputed these facts. By the spring of 2011, when Kate Black first reviewed the resulting criminal case, the Harris County District Attorney’s office had already set Buck’s execution date. He had six months to live.

Black is a staff attorney at the Houston-based legal non-profit Texas Defender Services (TDS), charged with directing the impending clemency proceedings for death row inmates. The group is at the center of a small community of elite death-penalty defense practitioners in Texas, who try hard to ensure the judicial system functions properly even in the most extreme circumstances.

“We were doing the petition,” Black says, “and in the course of investigating it, we realized there was this huge issue that hadn’t been litigated.”

Texas allows death sentences only if prosecutors can show that a defendant poses a future danger to society. At Buck’s sentencing hearing, his initial court-appointed defense attorney, Jerry Guerinot, presented testimony from a psychiatrist named Walter Quijano. It was unlikely that Buck, an African-American with no prior violent convictions, would commit similar acts in the future, Quijano stated, but Buck’s race nonetheless “increased the probability.” The claim was scientifically inaccurate and morally bankrupt. The prosecution leaned on it heavily during closing arguments.

Read Full – https://www.houstoniamag.com/articles/2016/12/29/texas-2016-execution-tally-lowest-since-1996