Tag Archives: california laws

Is a nanny cam legal in California?

Q We have a few concealed cameras placed in our home so we can keep track of what is happening while away. This is in part because our 6-year-old has different baby-sitters. Is there anything illegal about the cameras?

— B.K., Rancho Palos Verdes

A It is legal to have a video-only recording of activities inside your home. You are not required to let anyone know, nor does it matter if the camera is hidden. But that video must be utilized for a reasonable purpose. It cannot be an overt invasion of someone’s privacy. For example, we are all entitled to a reasonable expectation of privacy, such as when we are taking a shower.

Under California law, it is potentially illegal if such a camera also records audio. It is not lawful to record an oral communication through use of a hidden camera or device if a person has not consented to it.

Q Is there no invasion of our privacy posed by all these video cameras outside on buildings?

— C.D., El Segundo

A If you are out in public, such as walking on a sidewalk, you are pretty much fair game. Further, the video cameras do not physically intrude into your sphere of privacy. Thus, making a claim for invasion of privacy because of an outdoor video camera, while you are out in public, would be quite challenging.

It is a different situation, for examples, if you are in a bathroom facility, inside a hotel room or in a changing room at a clothing store. The nature of your activity, and your location, are factors to evaluate if you believe your right of privacy has been wrongly invaded.

Full Read – http://www.dailybreeze.com/general-news/20170131/ask-the-lawyer-is-a-nanny-cam-legal-in-california

Drug makers spend big to fight California price control referendum

Drug Companies To Pour $100M Into Battle Against California’s Price Control Ballot Initiative

The initiative, likened by one lobbyist to a “grenade being rolled into the conversation,” would require the state to pay no more for prescription drugs than the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and the industry is gearing up to fight back. In other news, Novartis’ heart-failure drug is getting a warmer welcome in Europe than America, and the company is considering its options in selling its stake in Roche.

Politico: Drug Makers Spend Big To Fight California Price Control Referendum

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton give drug makers the jitters when they talk about Medicare negotiating the prices of prescription drugs. But the biggest near-term threat to the industry comes from a California ballot initiative that would test a version of that idea in the most populous state. That ballot initiative “is a grenade being rolled into the conversation, and it is being taken very seriously,” says a Republican drug lobbyist in Washington, D.C. (Cook and Karlin-Smith, 4/25)

The industry is expected to pour $100 million into an effort to squash the November ballot initiative.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton give drug makers the jitters when they talk about Medicare negotiating the prices of prescription drugs. But the biggest near-term threat to the industry comes from a California ballot initiative that would test a version of that idea in the most populous state.

That ballot initiative “is a grenade being rolled into the conversation, and it is being taken very seriously,” says a Republican drug lobbyist in Washington, D.C.

Drug companies are expected to pour $100 million into an effort to squash the referendum in what will be a test of the industry’s strength at a time of growing consumer backlash against drug prices. The initiative would require the state to pay no more for prescription drugs than the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs — one of the few federal agencies allowed to negotiate drug prices.

From the industry’s perspective, California could set a dangerous precedent. Besides having an economy the size of many small countries, the liberal bastion is often a laboratory for new ideas that take root and then spread east. That’s even more likely given that the presidential front-runners are pushing the federal government to negotiate drug prices for Medicare.

“This is the crack in the door” on drug pricing, said Jamie Court, president of Consumer Watchdog, a California nonprofit devoted to consumer protection issues. “If any Democrat in America wants bulk purchasing in Medicare, it will start with bulk purchasing for the most liberal state government in America.”

Which is precisely the intention of the initiative’s sponsor, Michael Weinstein, CEO of the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation. “If we win, we hope it will start a national prairie fire,” he said.

Weinstein pursued the ballot measure after years of in-your-face activism on AIDS and after watching the California state legislature fail to do anything about drug prices — a big concern to people with HIV/AIDS who may be taking costly drugs for the rest of their lives.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2016/04/drug-makers-california-referendum-222334#ixzz471Q9mg4k
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Robert Downey Jr. gets holiday pardon from Gov. Jerry Brown for 1990s drug offenses

Actor Robert Downey Jr., who spent time behind bars in the late 1990s on drug convictions, received a Christmas Eve pardon from Gov. Jerry Brown, effectively removing a black mark from the movie star’s checkered past.

The actor was one of 91 people to whom the governor granted clemency for past crimes, most of them minor drug offenses that no longer are felonies under California law, as well as robbery and burglary. It has become an annual Christmas Eve tradition: official proclamations for men and women who previously served time for mostly nonviolent crimes.

Downey has a long history of problems with drugs and the law, including repeated arrests in 1996.

In June 1996, he was pulled over by police in Malibu for speeding. They found him under the influence, with a gun, cocaine and heroin in the truck.

Then in July, the then-31-year-old actor turned up in the house of a neighbor, passed out in a spare bedroom. At the time, he had just completed the film “One Night Stand,” portraying a character dying from AIDS.

“It’s like I’ve got a shotgun in my mouth, my finger on the trigger and I like the taste of gun metal,” Downey told a Los Angeles judge in 1999, as he was sentenced to three years in state prison. He was released one year later, and three months after that, was arrested in a Palm Springs hotel room where cocaine also was found.

He bounced between jail and rehabilitation clinics for several years, but then remarried and, in 2008, rekindled his acting career in the role of Tony Stark and “Iron Man” in a series of Marvel films.

In total, the actor served 15 months behind bars, and in 2002, he completed his parole.

Downey obtained an order on Oct. 20 from a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge, finding that he has since “lived an honest and upright life, exhibited good moral character, and conducted himself as a law-abiding citizen.”

On Oct. 28, Brown inducted Downey into the California Hall of Fame, alongside Charlie Brown cartoonist Charles M. Schulz and country music legend Buck Owens.

The Christmas Eve pardon reads, “By completion of his sentence and good conduct in the community of his residence since his release, Robert John Downey, Jr. has paid his debt to society and earned a full and unconditional pardon.”

Read Full Article – http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-sac-jerry-brown-robert-downey-jr-pardon-20151224-story.html